Repatriation to the Tune of Revolution, suitable for singing

Without footnotes, and with added language:

Revolution was written in 1968 by John Lennon and Paul McCartney.  “If you go carrying pictures of Chairman Mao/You ain’t gonna make it with anyone anyhow” provides the meter for the last couplet in each stanza. The Beatles’ “Well, you know” lines are omitted.  Youtube.com lets people listen to the tune, as if that complied with copyright laws.

You say you want repatriation:
(That’s what you say)
A tax-free corp’rate holiday.
You talk about the job creation
(You talk a lot)
That you’ll produce once you can pay
Big dividends out of the cash that you’ve stashed offshore;
But that didn’t work when we tried in Two thousand four.
Why don’t you go and pay
That tax?
Your tax.
Your tax.

You say don’t tax your foreign income
(You say it’s foreign):
It came from Ireland or somewhere.
Through paper comp’nies there have been some
(Quite complicated)
Shenanigans to shift it there.
With so much intangibles income concealed through Dutch
Sandwiches we don’t believe we can trust you much.
You just don’t want to pay
That tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.

You’ve come up with a new solution
(Or explanation)
Because you didn’t hire last time:
Now, when you make a distribution
(Or buy your stock),
The whole economy will climb.
But when you were shifting that income the rules were clear:
Pay tax on the income whenever you bring it here.
So go ahead and pay
That tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.

You say your plan will help the budget
(That’s what you say),
But one good pop is all we’ll get.
We won’t misjudge it; you can’t fudge it
(We won’t be fooled):
Your scheme will just create more debt.
Now if in your fantasy our Uncle Sam should drown,
You don’t give a damn if your schemes bring the country down.
We ought to make you pay
That tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.
Your tax.

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Author: patoglesby

From 1982 to 1990, I worked in tax policy for Committees of the United States Congress. In recent years, I was Adjunct Lecturer at UNC-Chapel Hill's Business School and then Adjunct Professor at its Law School.

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